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sirdan

The Golden Ratio

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Just to clarify - are you talking about the Golden Mean (in your title), or the Golden Ratio (what you linked to)? Mind-blowing, indeed, which ever one :) Thanks for the link and the food for thought :o

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Oww! You broke my head!!

 

O why did I click on this without checking the category first.....

 

I'm afraid this is as close as my brain can get:

 

hinde.jpg:o Yarr!

 

English explorer Francis Drake sailed around the world between 1577 and 1580 in his galleon the Golden Hind. On his voyage Drake was able to seize large amounts of treasure from Spanish possessions in South America. As a result of his success, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth I of England. This replica of Drake’s galleon can be seen on the Thames River in London.

 

(from MSN Encarta)

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What I find most interesting about the Golden Ratio is its prevalence in Nature. The Wikipedia article you linked to discusses how this number figures in a local sense with Nature ... you might also find it interesting to know that this number pops up even at the cosmological level, in the thermodynamics of Kerr black holes for example, making it a rather singular number, indeed ;) If you're interested in a little further reading, I recommend giving this a shot, paying particular attention to pages 26 - 28. It's the 2003 annual report from the Space Telescope Science Institute, in .pdf format.

 

Mugwump: I never knew the name of Drake's ship was the Golden Hind :P

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The golden ratio is approximately 1.6180339887.

 

 

how the hell is that approximately? xD wouldent approximately be like 1.6?

 

uncyclopedia's version

Edited by thelethalmoo

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The golden ratio is approximately 1.6180339887.

 

 

how the hell is that approximately?

Because

1.6180339887498948482045868343656381177203091798057628621354486227052604628189024497072072041893911374847540880753868917521266338622235369317931800607667263544333890865959395829056383226613199282902678806752087668925017116962070322210432162695486262963136144381497587012203408058879544547492461856953648644492410443207713449470495658467885098743394422125448770664780915884607499887124007652170575179788341662562494075890697040002812104276217711177780531531714101170466659914669798731761356006708748071

is more precise. But that too, is an approximation.

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how the hell is that approximately? xD wouldent approximately be like 1.6?
1.6180339887498948482 is quite approximate, considering the decimal values for this number go on forever :P

 

Too cool! I'd never heard of Uncyclopedia before - Mr. T and the Golden Ratio, roflmao :D

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It is as aproximate as saying that pi=3.14159265 and e=2.7182 and sqrt(2)=1.4142 :>

 

I've read once there is a mystic number 1/137 in physique. Anybody heard anything about it?

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i was told something like this in Maths but it's called the golden rectangle

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Hah, thanks for the link! I've read about it in Leon Lederman's book:)

Which book, The God Particle? I haven't read it yet, did you like it?

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Hah, thanks for the link! I've read about it in Leon Lederman's book:)

Which book, The God Particle? I haven't read it yet, did you like it?

 

Aye, The God Particle :>

It is the absolutely awesome book. It leads you by hand from the early beginning of the particle physics to the 'almost' nowadays. If you're looking for an easy to read book about particle physics it's your choice. Yet, do not expect from it too much detailed knowledge :P

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