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Gravito

Entropy and the mystery of the Dark Energy

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What a forerunner our master truly is.

I've started with work from our predecessors. Continued with Stephen Hawking, Continued with Penrose and Kip Thorne and Lawrence Krauss. Goin on along with String Theorys Brian Greene and Edward Witten. Listening alot lately to Arkani Hamed. But when i got upon Erik Verlinde and hes probably fearful venture into Gravity as an Entropic force i found excellent citations like these:

 

If everything in the universe is affected by Entropy then the energy in vacuum must also be. Since the only way to effectively dilute that energy is to spread it over a larger area then that is why the universe is expanding and 'dark energy' is just a name for what's happening.

 

So before his time.

I truly belive Entropy is holding the key to ToE.

Please comment.

Here's a laugh for everyone. Odd theory of the day. If everything in the universe is affected by entropy then the energy in vacuum must also be. Since the only way to effectively dilute that energy is to spread it over a larger area then that is why the universe is expanding and 'dark energy' is just a name for what's happening.

 

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-01-dark-energy-symmetrons.html#jCp

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Uhhhh...

 

http://en.wikipedia..../Entropic_force

 

All definitions for entropy/entropic word combos are so complex you have to reread things several times to get a clue as to what the hell they are talking about.

 

Last I knew, entropy meant "the inability to do work due to chaotic nature".

 

from wikipedia: In physics, an entropic force acting in a system is a phenomenological force resulting from the entire system's statistical tendency to increase its entropy, rather than from a particular underlying microscopic force.

 

Here is a crazy idea for you though....what if what we think we know about gravity is a bad assumption? What if the reason why closer things affect stuff have a greater gravitational affect is because there is a greater angular area (imagine a sphere around an item and then mark spots on the sphere that are inbetween the two items. the more filled in, the more angular area) and so an object with a set density would have less gravitational force if it was much smaller? That means that as the center of the universe collapses in on itself from gravity, it would have less pull on the rest of the universe and so the universe would expand. I am no physicist, so I don't know if that logic actually makes much sense, if it is right, if it is wrong or if it is only partially right.

Edited by nathanstenzel

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Ah. Solid angle seems to be the term for what I was talking about.

 

I am not certain how much the density of items at a specific angle actually matter, but perhaps not nearly as much as the solid angle.

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