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Windows vs Linux..

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I reluctntly switched to windows from dos shell..now i've been using XP since it came out..

I've been spending to much time fighting viruses and am tired of all the background programs running.. if i want to install something i have to tell firewall its ok then spyware terminator then spy bot ect ect..also i fresh install about every 3 months.. so yes i'm sick of XP and everything i read and hear says vista's worse..

So for you who have thought about switching from microsoft - here's my experience..

 

A few days ago i switched os to Ubuntu.. here are a few differences that i see:

Windows: fresh install put disc in answer a few questions put in a 20 digit code 1 hr later you have a OS..then from cd load anti virus and spywear programs and firewall while waiting a hour for those to download install drivers windows couldnt fine graphics sound and ethernet... a hour later run spybot (before actuling connecting to internet with browser - finds 1 worm and 1 trojan....so begins XP experience..

programs with xp:

notepad

picture viewer

media player (must download codecs for anything to work)

explorer (worst browser) update it b4 using..30min

decent e-mail program

a few games

Ubuntu place disk in select take over disk -answer a few questions 20min later you have OS.

all drivers found.. no need for firewall or virus programs ;)

Programs with Ubuntu:

Open office -(compare to micro word)

Gimp -(compare to photoshop)

Audio/video cd extractor cd/dvd burner movie player and music player

version of firefox browser -top rated browser

E-mail program

there is also a list (500) or so programs you can install with a single click..

 

What I did when i got to ubuntu - i downloaded Opera browser -selected open with on downlaod and all i did was select install easy downloaded el and installed with a easy script program..

Set my daughters pic as background wallpaper.. downloaded my i-pod to music and ripped a cd to mp3 and added to i pod.. all just as easy as in windows -if not easier..

 

Oh and best thing? My fps in el went up! :) and i have no viruses!!

 

So why would anyone stay with Microsoft???

Ubuntu is this easy and it's not the easiest distro out there - look ay freespire or PClinuxOS they are even easier... you can download them and burn to cd any try them without uninstalling windows..i reccomend everyone to check this out

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there is also a list (500) or so programs you can install with a single click..

I think you'll find there's just a tad bit more than 500 ;)

 

Glad to hear you got Ubuntu working and are liking it Bur! :D

 

I like debian based distros too (currently running Ubuntu 8.04 as well), mainly due to the great package management system and the mass amount of available packages (18733 at last count ^^ ...u see what i mean by "tad" lol). But, i'm a minimalist when it comes to my OS, so next week i'm gonna get Debian Lenny (Testing) 'netinst' ISO (base/core Debian, ~150MB ISO) and build up the OS from that :) (...just thought i'd throw in my own little Linux story :))

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good to hear that you're happy with it.

work a while with it and you will be even more happy with all the possibilities you have now.

 

my personal highlights are:

 

- the outstanding documentation

- the easy configurability (as soon as you know your way around on *nix systems everything becomes very easy)

- and of course great stability and flexibility

 

(i would like to add perl to the list but that is somehow offtopic and runs even under windows :))

 

 

the reason why your fps went up is very easy btw.:

microsoft has not much interest in supporting opengl applications as they have their directx ;)

(when you're not fast enough make the others slower)

 

 

and as an advice :

if you face a problem it is usually easier to fix than you can imagine. the typical windows error solution of "reinstall and reboot" on the other

hand doesn't work anymore, you have to read logfiles and tune settings in configurationfiles and from time to time compile something yourself.

you got an os that is talking to you, you just have to listen :D

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And in addition to the great documentation, the Ubuntu forums have a massive amount of troubleshooting threads already.

Most problems i've come up against i've found the solution on the Ubuntu forums... and Ubuntu forums are well cataloged by Google ;)

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My experience with windows wasn't as bad as you made it out to be.

I have been running vista for 7 months now, and I don't have any major problems with it. On 2 rare occurrences, my computer rebooted itself uncontrollably, due to some "graphics driver error". Once you clean it up, I think vista is a decent OS. I can boot as fast on vista as I can on ubuntu, at around 30 seconds.

 

My first experience from linux was ubuntu. My wireless driver didn't work, and I don't have the smarts to fix it. I am not tech-savvy when it comes to code. Also, I have a widescreen laptop, and ubuntu doesn't support my resolution (800x1280) that I can see from the configuration options. I tried to install el, and I was given a folder with a bunch of files, of which I didn't know what to do.

I like the fact that you have free programs like GIMP, but I wish I could figure out how to set it up to look like photoshop. GIMP also doesn't have (to my knowledge) some editing options I use on photoshop.

If I could figure out Linux, I am sure it would be a great OS, but for now, I am stuck with Vista.

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My windows xp works with a charm. the only problem i have is the slowness of my computer, it has 256mb ram -_-

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My experience with windows wasn't as bad as you made it out to be.

I have been running vista for 7 months now, and I don't have any major problems with it. On 2 rare occurrences, my computer rebooted itself uncontrollably, due to some "graphics driver error". Once you clean it up, I think vista is a decent OS.

 

I have to agree with that it is a decent OS once you clean it up. I have been running vista for 10 months and only 2 problems. Graphics driver error twice in a week but it rebooted and worked perfect after the second time. I rather have Windows then Linux. :confused:

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I installed Ubuntu 2 days ago on my new comp, just to give it a try, and i must say it looks nice and is fast.

 

Slowly i'm getting used to it since the desktop is a little bit different from SuSE and KDE i was using before.

 

My only problem right now is, from where do i install additional software, e.g. here is now a gcc installed, but all include files are missing, so i can't even compile a hello_world.c which includes stdio.h...

 

On the other hand, i was able to install other stuff like Miro, games and other applications, but i am not able to get a gcc to run..

 

Is it a special data source i have to add, a hidden category (i *HAVE* a gcc, but i cant install/update it anywhere in the packet manager, same with #include's, libs, etc.)

 

Well if someone has a hint, post here, that might be interesting for others too (points at the 500 available applications for ubuntu :confused: ).

 

So off to start Miro and watch Mythbusters i am, lol :D

 

Piper

 

PS: cya in game, when i found at least some SDL libs to download and install anywhere :P

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Honestly Piper.

 

If you have a little computing know-how, I would recommend Slackware Linux. It is the oldest distro, and not for computing newbies. It installs everything you need right away to compile away, which is a little easier imo then struggling finding packages, updaters, etc. ubuntu does a dam fine job. Slackware also uses kde by default (if you want Xorg windows running) Though it is an option.

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Umm, i think at least, that i have a little computer know-how, like how to switch on a comp :confused:

 

Problem is, that i didnt had a slackware distro here (and a fast internet connection to download it), but just some distros like Ubuntu on some DVD's.

 

And since i want to have at least ONE working linux distro on my new comp, i choosed the Ubuntu one.

 

Lets not start a discussion about distros right now, at least my Vista is dead and i can partition my HD now \ö/

 

Piper

Edited by The_Piper

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In ubuntu

sudo apt-get install build-essential

install everything that you need to compile simle programs (gcc, make, headers, ...)

 

To install sdl libs

sudo apt-get install libsdl-dev libsdl-image1.2-dev libsdl-mixer-dev libsdl-net1.2-dev

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Umm, i think at least, that i have a little computer know-how, like how to switch on a comp :confused:

 

Problem is, that i didnt had a slackware distro here (and a fast internet connection to download it), but just some distros like Ubuntu on some DVD's.

 

And since i want to have at least ONE working linux distro on my new comp, i choosed the Ubuntu one.

 

Lets not start a discussion about distros right now, at least my Vista is dead and i can partition my HD now \ö/

 

Piper

 

Yes..I am very sure you do mate. I only suggest slackware as a nice stable package indendent platform that just seems to work better out of the box to compile just about anything you like.

 

And Vista is dead...wooot. Piper pked vista!

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Slackware is a nice distro but honestly when you worked ages with suse you're fucked when trying something different ;p

to run slackware you need basic vi skills because there is no yast or something :confused:

first thing to be done in slack is fixing the xkb* settings in xorg (when running a non en* keyboardlayout) ;p

i used slackware a long time myself, atm i'm in debian lenny/sid (mixed system to fit my needs)

 

for the debian based systems there is synaptic, thats the source you looking for piper ;p

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Thanks, now i could install some needed libs and header files and at least can start the client. Now i have to mess with versions of libraries, i guess, since i see just my char, cant type anything and dont see icons, lol.

 

But why the heck does Ubuntu have 2 or even more package managers?

 

One, which is easily to access from the menu, but doesnt show everything and a 2nd one which lets you install more stuff?

 

Piper

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One, which is easily to access from the menu, but doesnt show everything and a 2nd one which lets you install more stuff?

 

one is for the idiots unskilled users, one for the average user :) and teh pr0s using aptiude or old style apt* etc.

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One, which is easily to access from the menu, but doesnt show everything and a 2nd one which lets you install more stuff?

 

one is for the idiots unskilled users, one for the average user :P and teh pr0s using aptiude or old style apt* etc.

 

You mean there's a GUI for apt-get/aptitude? :):P

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to run slackware you need basic vi skills because there is no yast or something wink.gif

I don't remember having to touch vim in slackware at all. Nano (or actually it was pico at the time) worked just fine. At one point in time I could use vim...but, I guess, I just never liked it, but I didn't give it much of a chance either.

 

As for what I use, I run Gentoo Linux on my laptop. This may seem strange to some, but I like how easy it is to install software on gentoo (generally). emerge packagename and you are done. On top of that, I have the flexibility to really choose what I want on my system and am completely in control.

 

On the other hand, I find it funny how the original post talked about how easy the driver issues were >_> It took a lot (if I knew what I knew now, it would have just involved adding a few lines to /etc/portage/packages.keywords, but whatever...) of effort to get any hardware acceleration on my laptop and to do it I am running a bunch of beta software. Though, there is also some relatively new hardware in my laptop also :S

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yes, hardware issues especially with notebooks are quit a problem , but its quit amazing to see the changes happened there in the past years i remember that i had to build my own kernel using some ultra hacky patches to get my first pcmcia wlan card working (i was lucky to had one that works at all) ..

 

best thing is to look for some information before buying it , http://www.linux-laptop.net/ is a good source.

 

the problem is that many hardware company give a fuck about linuxdrivers or give only out binarys, because they're afraid that some1 could steal their software(that only forces ppl to reverse that stuff) and for some devices its simply impossible to get them work. i have a cardreader in my notebook that dosent work, but i knew its not working before i bought it and since i dont need it - well the rest is working fine, maybe some lil hacks o some places but its working without trouble.

 

the common linux newbie dont really look for hardware compatibility lists, thats prolly the top reason for later trouble as many ppl are not used to all these things. but looking back i think we'll see many improvements in the next years.

 

i would really like to see more hardware support under freebsd, too. nice system but as long as there is no way to get all my tiny toys (like dvb-t card) working i wont really use that system.

 

anything but no microsoft anymore ^^ had so much pain with it ad the worst thing is, after some time of working with it you just dont realize how bad it is. lol

all those billions of stupid reboots... "oh wait my monitor went black - brb rebooting", "dang! bsod, rebooting..", "just downloaded newest updates and rebooting. when back on checking out for the updates to the updates and do some more rebooting", "oh new directx and mediaplayer! damnit i have to reboot twice.." , "my comp is so slow... i think of formating disk and give it a new try... and do some reboots!"

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As of today, I have everything that I have wanted working on my Vostro 1400 under Gentoo working (Hardware acceleration, dual monitors, built-in SD/MMC card slot, etc). The only thing that doesn't work is the built-in mic....which is rather annoying, but plugging in a mic works just fine.

 

It took me a little under a year...however, a lot of it was me not having the time to read up and me simply waiting for updated drivers to come out with support for my hardware.

 

----------------------------------

Anyway, as for manufactures not caring. It does seem Dell is taking an interest in linux and that has been helping linux a fair ammoutn with some hardware. Also, I don't know the whole story, but Dell released some information about a SD/MMC controller to fix a problem where you could only read SD cards but not MMC cards (because their is actually a separte, unused, MMC controler when the SD controller can handle MMC cards just fine). I actually ran into that issue today, and solved it fairly quickly.

 

Linux support is deffinately getting here and I will say I am very happy with my linux desktop. I especially love gentoo where things work just how I want them. I have a sort of windows-mac hybrid with KDE (I mainly make use of a mac-style bar at the top of my screen, but also have my taskbar at the bottom with the normal menus), I have an anime themed boot-up and shutdown screens that "I" created (really, I just modified a cool background a little...), differnt backgrouds on every desktop that change every 5 minutes (I love that feature...and..you can't do it on windows without third-party software). Oh, and I like the commands I have set up to switch windows between multiple desktops by pressing Win+Alt+arrow keys or to switch between desktops by pressing Win+arrowkey Just having all that control to customize my experience is really cool...and I can do it with not too much hassle (a lot of that has to do with KDE though, not gentoo :-P...but, when gentoo, I only have the junk I want installed instead of all of KDE or parts of KDE I don't need/want).

 

------------------------------

 

On the other hand, there are people who don't really care or wnat that kind of flexibility and from what I have heard ubuntu/gnome do a great job of that too. Windows seems to be in the middle of things, and I think in these two regards, linux really wins.

 

On my laptop (I use windows on my "main computer" because 80% of it isen't mine, and I'll be goign to college soon anyway...plus, my laptop is signigantly better than my main computer) the only time I really boot into windows now is to play Playstation games with epsxe. Unfortunately, that's really only because I'm having trouble getting the 32-bit versions of any PS emulator running with crashing my whole system when it tries to use a little 3D acceleration (other 64-bit 3D aps work just fine without crashing my system though...either way, I am running beta/alpha drivers).

 

EDIT: Hmm, I just managed to crash gentoo playing Eternal Lands by changing the volume (though, from what happened, I can safely say it was related to the graphics drivers). Either way...that's beta for you. Regardless, I'm not that big on games anyway.

Edited by chatterbug89

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